Three Rivers
Hudson~Mohawk~Schoharie
History From America's Most Famous Valleys


         Wikipedia.

           December 7, 2007.  It is true that Wikipedia claims it doesn’t warranty the contents on their site. I understood that, but the site said the articles could be edited. That is not true. I tried several times and the author wants history the way he wrote it, not the way it happened. Period.

          The following is from Wikipedia, under the subject of Jacob Klock, the first article put up about the colonel..

Jacob Klock
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
          Colonel Jacob George Klock (1738-1814) was a colonel of the Tryon County militia during the American Revolution.
          He was born March 9, 1738 in the Mohawk Valley of New York, the son of George Klock and Catherine Walrath. In 1777, he was chairman of the Tryon County Committee of Safety. He was the colonel of the 2nd Regiment of the Tryon County militia during the American Revolution. He was at the Battle of Oriskany and other battles. He was appointed a judge in Montgomery County. He represented Tryon County in the New York state assembly from September 1777 to 1778.
          He died September 8, 1814 in Kingston, Ulster County, New York.
References-- Bery, A.J. A Time of Terror, The story of Jacob Klock's regiment and the people they protected, 2005, ISBN 1-4120-6527-5
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Klock"

         The information cited pertains to Jacob G. Klock, who was NOT Colonel Jacob Klock.  The colonel didn’t seem to have a middle name, no one knows the birth date of the colonel or who his parents were, and he didn’t die in 1814, but in 1798 in the area now known as St. Johnsville, not in Kingston, NY.  The colonel wasn’t a judge or member of the New York State Assembly or Senate.

         No original source material gives any information on the early life of the colonel. Jacob served as a captain during the French and Indian War and it is the first mention we can find on Jacob Klock, the one who became a colonel. There were several earlier, before Colonel Jacob Klock Because of the Palatine habit of naming after the previous generation, there were many Jacob Klocks in the valley at the time of the war. Each generation and each child from each gneration named their children after the previous generation.

          Here are the links to Col. Jacob Klock’s will, the handwritten one--KLOCK, Col. Jacob Page One, Page Two. This is a graphic, so be patient, it is a slow load.  And finally, here is the link to the transcription of the will. KLOCK, Col. Jacob The will was probated and I'm sure the court wouldn't have probated the will unless the colonel was deceased. You will note the year was 1798, not 1814. No one knows where the colonel was buried though it is suspected in the old cemetery near where the log church called Klock's Church was located.

           December 8, 2007. The article was corrected, supposedly. Jacob lost his middle name, was the only improvement. At least the author tried to pull in some other references to support the fiction. The dates of Jacob's life span are wrong and a lot of the rest of the information is not correct. The article in the box is what has been posted on Widipedia.

         Colonel Jacob Klock (1738-1814) was the colonel of the 2nd regiment of the Tryon County militia during the American Revolutionary War.

         He was the son of George Klock and Margaret Catherine Walrath. George Klock was a farmer and trader who kept a disreputable store and tavern next to the Mohawk village of Canajoharie. The Mohawk Canajoharie chief complained to William Johnson "I am under the necessity of complaining again, against that old rogue, the old disturber of our village, George Klock". Joseph Brant and others broke into his house and forced him to relinquish his claim to the Mohawk village of Canajoharie Jacob Klock married Anna Nelles in Albany County on April 7, 1763.

         He was at the Battle of Oriskany and other battles. In 1777, he was chairman of the Tryon County Committee of Safety.

         In 1777, he was a judge for Tryon County. He represented Tryon County in the New York state assembly from September 1777 to 1778, and was a member of the New York state senate from the western district from 1778-1785.

           After talking to some of my friends who are involved in local research, I am quite disheartened with Wikipedia. They too have found the site does as it wishes and has some very inaccurate information which seems to be impossible to correct. Several have tried, but none were successful in their efforts. There are a lot of errors in regards to the history of the Mohawk Valley, the various battles, the people involved in the battles, etc. Be very careful when you read their information. One of my books is misused to support the erronous information, much to my disgust and some of the other local authors have had their works used too without their permission. It makes it sound as if we support the information on the site, which is not so.

           December 9, 2007. The story continues. Now the article says the colonel died in 1798 and it cites my book as the source. I still am very unahppy! The rest of the fiction remains on the site. I looks like the author has combined three and probably four Klocks in the article. What the profile on the colonel has to do with the bit about George is a puzzle. It looks like the author is trying to cast mud on the colonel. The dead cannot speak for themselves, this is very unethical. AJ Berry

           Dave Klock posted this to the wiki site: My name is Dave Klock and I research the Klock family and write a monthly newsletter called Klock Connections. I would like to comment on this little article that is on this site on Col. Jacob Klock. You have at least three Jacob Klocks mixed up here. First of all, no one really knows the birth year of Col. Jacob Klock or who his parents really were. It is generally accepted that he was the son of Hendrick Klock, but no one really knows for sure. Col. Jacob Klock did die in 1798, that part is correct, but he was not Judge Jacob Klock and did not serve as a member of the New York Assembly. That was his nephew (the son of Old George) who was the Judge. There are always two sides to every story and the information about Old George is very one sided, the side of Sir. William Johnson. Klock and Johnson were enemies, both trying to get as much land as possible and at any means they felt necessary, I am not saying he was a Saint, he wasn’t, but it is unfair to condemn him or anyone using only one side of the story. At any rate, I thought I should let you know that you have several Jacob Klocks here and not just Col. Jacob Klock. -- Dave Klock

           Below is the latest correction. It seems to be getting worse.

Colonel Jacob Klock (1738-1798) was the colonel of the 2nd regiment of the Tryon County militia during the American Revolutionary War.

He was the son of George Klock and Margaret Catherine Walrath. George Klock was a farmer and trader who kept a disreputable store and tavern next to the Mohawk village of Canajoharie. The Mohawk Canajoharie chief complained to William Johnson "I am under the necessity of complaining again, against that old rogue, the old disturber of our village, George Klock". Joseph Brant and others broke into his house and forced him to relinquish his claim to the Mohawk village of Canajoharie Jacob Klock married Anna Nelles in Albany County on April 7, 1763.

He was at the Battle of Oriskany and other battles In 1777, he was chairman of the Tryon County Committee of Safety.

In 1777, he was a judge for Tryon County. He represented Tryon County in the New York state assembly from September 1777 to 1778, and was a member of the New York state senate from the western district from 1778-1785.

He died in Montgomery County, New York in 1798.

Since Brad Majors (Wiki author) brought up the subjects:

Here is the story of Jacob G. Klock

Why land was important to the Palatines.

The dispute between George and Sir William (Personally, when I read about the land dealings I wondered how Sir William could protest, he robbed the Indians of a LOT of land. You should read his will to get an idea of his vast holdings, especially the Royal Grant. He was the bigger thief, he just did it with charm.)

December 10, 2007. The opening page to Jacob Klock shows two of them with the information about Jacob G. Klock being the judge is correct, but still the part for the colonel is showing information about George Klock and his land dealings. This really has nothing to do with the colonel, we do not know who his parents were. Some have published otherwise, but there is no real proof. Many have looked long and hard for the proof, but there is none. I am very unhappy with Wiki using ME as a reference for incorrect information.

I have tried to straighten it out, but they want proof. I can't see Wiki had proof to put it on in the first place. It looks like Wiki is trying to discredit the colonel. ajberry


Opening Page for Three Rivers, Hudson, Mohawk, Schoharie
Morrison's Pensions - Revolutionary War Pensions, Military Information.
French and Indian Wars
- Information about the wars.
War of 1812 - Information about the war, pensions.
Civil War - Information about the war, pensions.

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